Audioarts Consoles

Flexible. Affordable. Built to last.

WheatstoneNAB BANNER

WheatstoneNewRadio2015Brochure

Need a small digital mixer for a big job? Or an IP console that will get you started in AoIP networking? Audioarts Engineering is the rock star of affordable mixers and consoles for production, news, podcating, LPFM or web radio – or any combination of these -- because we make them compact, straightforward, and robust. Audioarts consoles and mixers are Wheatstone’s most prolific brand, owing their popularity to their small build and durable construction (no cheap switches for us). Anyone who has listened to radio for any length of time has no doubt heard an Audioarts radio console in action. That's how pervasive and powerful this product line is.

Click to download our NEW RADIO PRODUCTS FOR 2015 Brochure

FM-25: Perfect Companion for LPFM

Wheatstone FM25-v3NAB 2015, Wheatstone introduced the new FM-25, a multi-band audio processor ideal for LPFM or other FM stations requiring basic spectral audio shaping and peak limiting control. It includes new intelligent two-band AGC technology — or iAGC — coupled to a multiband limiter and stereo generator. The combination provides automatic, real-time program density control for a consistent, spectrally-balanced sound regardless of density variations in incoming source material.

Click to learn more!

Audioarts 08: Perfect for LPFM & Streaming

Audioart-08 ThreeQuarter 420

This NAB show saw the addition of the smallest member of the Audioarts line to date. The Audioarts 08 console is ideal for LPFMs, podcasts, web streaming or remote applications requiring a simple low profile eight-channel board..

 

Click for More Info On Audioarts 08!

 

 

 



 

Meet AIR-5...with optional Bluetooth!

AIR-FIVE-420

Wheatstone expanded its Audioarts line this NAB with the introduction of the Air-5 Bluetooth compatible audio console, a 16-fader console with all the essentials for smaller studios or for newsrooms.

 

Click for More Info On AIR-5!

 



 

Network EDGE wins TWO NAB Best of Show Awards!

RadioAward 420

RW Award 420

We are EXCEPTIONALLY excited to have won BEST OF SHOW awards from both Radio Magazine AND Radio World Magazine for our brand new NETWORK EDGE!

Network EDGE is a designed specifically as a translator between high-quality, low-latency studio networks such as WheatNet-IP and low-bandwidth STL connectivity options such as IP wireless radios.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wheatstone-Eventide Handshaking

IMG 2634smallerIn celebration of Wheatstone's partnership with Eventide, Richard Factor, (left) Chairman of Eventide, and Gary Snow, (right) President of Wheatstone Corporation, did a bit of handshaking of their own at booth C755 at NAB 2015 in Las Vegas.

What are these two up to? WheatNet-IP integration into Eventide products, that's what. Eliminating one more network box in the studio chain, Eventide’s BD600W delay unit is now available with an optional WheatNet-IP network card for easy and seamless integration of profanity delay into the WheatNet-IP audio network. You can see this integration in action, live and up-close, at Eventide's booth #C2848.


 

 

Wheatstone At NAB

We had a GREAT NAB Show in Las Vegas! Won FOUR Best of Show awards!
Here are a few  images from our first day on the show floor:

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://www.audioartsengineering.com/#sigProGalleria5b7091bd62

Want to see more? The full photo galleries are here, updated as the show goes on: NAB 2015 Photos

Checking in with iHeartMedia Portland

iHeartRadio A_2560-MC
We dropped in on iHeartMedia in Portland recently to revisit a WheatNet-IP audio network that has been in operation since the seven-station cluster moved to Tigard, Oregon, in September 2012. Director of Engineering Chris Weiss showed us around the 17-studio, 25,000-square-foot facility and talked about life with audio over IP.

He recalled a recent remote at the Rose Quarter stadium for the Portland Trail Blazers (basketball sportscast) that involved all seven stations at the same time – an impossible feat before IP audio networking. “It was more a staffing issue; could we have enough promotion and programming staff to handle all this? But from an equipment standpoint, it was easy,” he said.

Read More...

At the center of the operation are the audio network’s core Cisco switches, which are bonded together on a backplane in the TOC, with gigabit/second connections to every other switch and element in the network. “Everything works better at a gig, especially NexGen (automation),” commented Weiss, who monitors network traffic on a regular basis. Normal NexGen traffic hovers around the 100 Mbps mark, whereas on the fiber connection to the hub point for all the cluster’s transmitter sites, Weiss routinely sees steady traffic at about 150 Mbps. “150 megabits. That freaked me out at first because you never see that kind of bandwidth solid on a circuit. But that’s what it takes because it’s running all this AoIP back and forth, and we run a video feed for the Trail Blazers over that,” he said.

The operation includes 56 WheatNet-IP I/O BLADEs, 49 audio drivers, 23 Wheatstone M2 dual-channel mic processors to handle 46 microphones, and 13 control surfaces all connected through a WheatNet-IP audio network.

Look for details in the recent issue of Radio magazine, which features the iHeartMedia Portland facility as its cover story in the February issue.

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://www.audioartsengineering.com/#sigProGalleria3d99162483

The Curious Behavior of Radios

CarRadio LargeLouder is better! Crank it up! Well, not so fast...

Ever wonder what your listeners' FM radios sound like when your station is knee deep in the loudness race and the modulation monitor is always pegged? Our audio processing development guru, Jeff Keith, wondered about that too.

Read More...

So, during one quiet week at the Wheat processing lab, he decided to find out. He selected 15 radio receivers that most represented the majority of radios out there in use, and got out his trusty modulation analyzers, signal generators and other assorted test gear. He ran audio sweeps of de-modulated and de-emphasized FM audio and plotted SMPTE IM distortion of the receiver’s audio output as modulation was raised, among other tests. His main goal was to discover distortion trends in radios during 110% or more modulation. Here are a few of his findings, the details of which will be presented during the upcoming NAB Broadcast Engineering Conference (BEC).

  • The more recent the radio model, the more intolerant of high modulation it is likely to be.
  • Newer AM/FM/HD radio IC chips detect high deviation (over-modulation) and often, in an attempt to fix the problem, create unpleasant audio effects.
  • Many consumer receivers have restrictive intermediate frequency (IF) bandwidths, which can mean perceptibly distorted audio even when tuned to a normally modulated station. The IF bandwidth of one radio measured was barely 100kHz wide at the 3dB point.
  • Half of the receivers tested added significant IM distortion at modulation levels as low as 120%.

Jeff Keith’s paper “The Curious Behavior of Consumer FM Receivers During Hyper-modulation” will be published in the 2015 NAB Broadcast Engineering Conference (BEC) Proceedings and presented during the NAB Engineering Conference, Sunday, April 12.

LPFM and the Audio Arts

ARTxFM v2You know that good feeling you get when your significant other surprises you with tickets to a game or gets your Starbucks order right?

Well, here it is, in the form of a note from new LPFMer ARTxFM posted on our Facebook page:

We just LOVE our AudioArts Air 1 --- perfect starter board for our new LPFM - WXOX 97.1 FM Louisville!!!

Congratulations to Sharon Scott, Sean Selby, Tim Barnes and all the others at ARTxFM, on their new non-profit LPFM after three years of hard work and involvement in the Louisville, Kentucky, music community. We love your experimental music format, your shows and the fact that you’re out there in the community covering the music scene. We’re listening.

 

 

Processing Tip

erickson rackHere's a helpful tip from Wheatstone Processing Guy Mike Erickson on keeping track of presets:

"One thing I try to remember to do when I'm making presets for a new install, or adjusting presets on a processor that's already online, is to date the presets. This not only gives you a good track record as to when you created that perfect sound, but it also allows you to go back if the PD complains that the processing ‘sounded better last week’ ... you'll know what preset to go back to even if you didn't physically write it down! Saving presets with the dates allows you to do the processing version of ‘System Restore.’ Also, it's a good idea to back up your presets. ALWAYS! I recall a Memorial Day failure of a processor in Market #1 going back almost 7 years ago. The backup switched on via silence sensor and I was able to swap out the main with another of the same model we had on the shelf and load the custom presets. Within an hour, we were back sounding as good as you could get with that box! The PD was nervous while I was swapping hardware that we wouldn't sound the same because all the presets were lost on the hardware. If I hadn't backed up the presets, weeks of work would have been down the drain.”

This tip is brought to you by our new FM-55 audio processor, which is so easy to adjust from the front panel, you might want to save and date presets for the presets.

Oh, The Voices -- Part II: Adjusting for Taste

SteveDove Altby Steve Dove, Minister of Algorithms

The most basic, and arguably the most powerful, tool for getting vocals to sound good is equalization.

It has two primary uses, to correct for errors or for artistic effect. Compression and limiting also can be useful for adjusting vocals, as I cover in some detail below.

But first, this PSA: The worst judge of microphone processor settings is the one doing the talking. Most folk swoon over massive proximity effect bass and vertigo-inducing compression in their own headphones, to extents that would be ludicrous on-air. Someone other than the talent should do the equalization and dynamics adjustments, thank you very much.

Read More

Oh, the Voices Part I: Tidying Up Talent Vocals

Steve DoveBy Steve Dove, Wheatstone Minister of Algorithms


The microphone processor has long been important but in recent years it has become vital. Mainly this is due to the recent trend of referencing audio to 0dBfs (the maximum signal level in a digital system) rather than the cozy old nominal 0dB VU. 

Read More

twitterfacebook